25 Best Movies Of Tom Hanks and Platforms To Watch Them | Entertainment

25 Best Movies Of Tom Hanks and Platforms To Watch Them | Entertainment
25 Best Movies Of Tom Hanks and Platforms To Watch Them

25 Best Tom Hanks Movies and Where to Watch Them

Tom Hanks big break in 1980 was with the late Peter Scolari as half of the sitcom duo Bosom Friends, and while his affable charm was already on display, it was unclear if he would one day become the most bankable and the most bankable in America . Dear movie stars. Hanks’ film career would begin four years later in Splash as Alan Bauer, an unlucky loving young man who falls for a mermaid. It was the first of several films that he anchored for director Ron Howard, and he was also a participant in several projects such as Steven Spielberg, Nora Efron, Robert Zemeckis, Penny Marshall and Paul Greengrass—everything from comedy to epic war. Leading the play he will voice one of the most iconic animated characters of all time as a little pull-string cowboy named Woody. And he will write, direct and star in two specials. He traveled to space, fought pirates and escaped a deserted island in his 49 starring roles, becoming America’s father in the process.

Today we take a look at the 25 best Tom Hanks movies.

25. Burbs

  • Year: 1989
  • Director: Joe Dante
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Carrie Fisher, Bruce Dern, Corey Feldman
  • Genre: Comedy
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 102 Minutes

Watch at the Peacock

Yes, it’s true that Joe Dante’s star was somewhat reduced to the horror scene after classics like Gremlins and The Howling, but The ‘Barbs remains a film that is somewhat overlooked today. A dark comic story with a touch of macabre, it initially looks like a very traditional comedy until Tom Hanks begins to suspect his new neighbors of killing and eating the old man at the end of the street Is. The cast is great, including Hanks in addition to Carrie Fisher, Bruce Dern, Corey Feldman, and the lesser (but hilarious) Henry Gibson. The star is at his best, bragging about missing his neighbors and generally looking extremely tense—you can’t miss this comic version of Tom Hanks, not the dramatic actor he is. has been made. The cheeky cinematography only adds to the zany feel, as in the scene where Hanks and his neighbor realize the bone they’re pouncing the dog could well be from the dead old man and the camera while zooming in. May engage in a long comedy scream in and out. In what may be Dante’s funniest film overall, there’s a lot of gallows humor in it.—Jim Worrell

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24. Sully

  • Year: 2016
  • Director: Clint Eastwood
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Aaron Eckhart, Laura Linney, Mike O’Malley, Anna Gunn, Jamie Sheridan
  • Genre: Drama
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 96 minutes

Watch on Amazon Prime

Clint Eastwood’s new film, Sully, is a nuanced description of the actions of Chelsea “Sully” Sullenberger (Tom Hanks), best known as the pilot who saved the life of an entire passenger plane on January 15, 2009, when He had miraculously landed on the plane. Hudson. An apparently heroic story starring one of the world’s best-loved movie stars, the biographical whitewash of American sniper Sully can easily be seen as a retrospective career move from Eastwood. could. Still, the most radical thing about Sully is her apparent interest in presenting this story as a thriller. Beginning with a throttling dream sequence, Sully’s opening foils her intentions. A better encapsulation follows minutes later as Sully corrects an officer who calls the incident an “accident.” “It was a force to be reckoned with,” he says assertively in a line of dialogue that would be cocky from any other actor, but feels intrigued by Hanks. In other words, by imitating the harmony of real-life events, it is an anti-disaster film. Sully is at the forefront of control, returning to Howard Hawks films such as the exploration of Only Angels Have Wings and an appreciation of the complexities of duty. Hanks received several small awards for his performance, but the film is ultimately a testament to Eastwood’s skill as a director. It’s exactly the kind of historical drama that Hollywood loves to churn out, but Sully just doesn’t feel like a paycheck. Like most of Eastwood’s work of later days, this is another flawed but thoughtful attempt. —Michael Snydel

23. Splash

  • Year: 1984
  • Director: Ron Howard
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Daryl Hannah, Eugene Levy
  • Genre: Romantic Comedy, Fantasy
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 111 minutes

Watch on Disney+

You know those moments when you unexpectedly find out you’ve crossed paths with a mermaid and suddenly you start wondering if that near-death experience you thought you had in Cape Cod when you were a kid, was there something deep and strange? She! One of the first pictures to come out of Disney’s new Touchstone imprint (PG for mild vulgar language?) is the little mermaid who saves her. by drowning. Literally, then figuratively. Come on guys: Metaphor! In addition to credit for popularizing “Madison” as a name for girls, the film was a critical success at the box office and for its old-fashioned sweetness and stellar performances of the classics Hanks and Hannah as well as John Candy and was a significant success. Eugene Levy. Ron Howard is a natural at the wistful school of comedy and the film basically feels like wall-to-wall. If you’re looking for a rom-com with sharp teeth, keep going—but any fan of Tom Hanks as the rom-com lead needs to see this movie. —Amy Glyney

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22. Path of Destruction

  • Year: 2002
  • Director: Sam Mendes
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Paul Newman, Jude Law, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Daniel Craig, Tyler HoechlinGenre: Thriller, Drama
  • Rating: R
  • Runtime: 117 minutes

Watch on Hulu

As he did in American Beauty, Sam Mendes creates another major tragedy here. Adapted from the graphic novel of the same name, Road to Perdition tells a captivating story about a father-and-son gangster and future gangster. There is warmth in their relationship, but the result proves cold, something Mendis goes through with beautifully bleak cinematography. In this underrated take on the mobster family dynamic, Mendes does what he does best by focusing on family and relationships when a son accidentally sees the darkness inside his mobster father. Tom Hanks and Jude Law are great in their rare dark performances, but Paul Newman stands out in his final film role as the consummate professional mobster grappling with what he’ll do with his protagonist (Hanks) post-partition. No-nonsense, chill-you-to-the-bones-with-his-coolness Paul Newman from Cool Hand Luke from The Hustler pulls off a blistering final fight before being tapped for good. Under heavy rain through the lens of DP Conrad Hall, Newman’s character perfectly awaits a flurry of gunfire, seconds away from tearing him apart, perfectly capturing the aura that Newman had in his He had cultivated a storied career. -Staff

21. You’ve Got Mail

  • Year: 1998
  • Director: Nora Efron
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Greg Kinnear
  • Genre: Romantic Comedy
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 119 minutes

Watch on HBO Max

Some movies are just pure testament to the power of relatable characters and believable screen chemistry, and Nora Efron’s You’ve Got Male is a prime example. Dramatically stunning and artistically unmistakable, it still draws you in with its Jane Austen-esque boyfriend-rival dynamic and general good nature. The third rom-com collaboration between Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan (and the most unaffected performance of Ryan’s trio) is the story of the unlikely (yet inevitable) coupling between an independent bookstore owner and the mogul at the helm of a mega-bookstore. Threatened him to close the business. In real life they can’t stand each other—but in an anonymous chat room, they get along and then some. Its protagonists, and sailing with the sheer choice of actors portraying them—Ryan’s best in a grounded, straight-up happy performance and Hanks-like limitless plasticity are in full flow—You’ve Got Male in Trades “Dear.” If this makes you itch, you’re in for a little scratch, but there’s a real heart to this movie that will reel even cynics. —Amy Glyney

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20. The Thing You Do

  • Year: 1996
  • Director: Tom Hanxo
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Tom Everett Scott, Liv Tyler, Johnathon Schacht, Steve Zahn, Ethan Embry, Charlize Theron
  • Genre: Comedy
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 108 minutes

Watch on Hulu

A lovingly brutal, goofy, and weird look at fame and the entertainment industry, the tale of one-hit wonders of the ’60s and their shark-with-a-heart-of-gold manager (Tom Hanks, also in his directorial debut ) ) is the charming embrace of a film. That Thing You Do is just as deceptively sharp and sticky-tacky-sweet as its central candy-coated pop tune, with the wide-eyed comedy delivered by its young cast of weird deadpan. Adam Schlesinger’s earworm melody and Hanks’ abilities as a first-time helmsman/writer keep the film sharp and light, even as it dumps on the business of being a star—and those average Americans who are being driven crazy by cigar-munchers. They have been trained for. But, like Hanks’ slick-appropriate cynicism, That Thing You Do can still see the bright side. Charming turns by Liv Tyler and Tom Everett Scott praise the more widely comic (but still excellent) performances by Johnathon Schacht and Steve Zahn, giving the film the extra oomph of comfort it needed to keep its ending happy. And Its Journey is a funny little joke that never takes itself too seriously.—Jacob Oler

19. Toy Story 3

  • Year: 2010
  • Director: Lee Unkrich
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Ned Beatty, Don Rickles
  • Genre: Animation, Adventure
  • Rating: G
  • Runtime: 103 Minutes

Watch on Disney+

At the conclusion of 1999’s Toy Story 2, the villain Stinky Pete asked Woody the Cowboy what he would do when Andy, his owner, grew up and no longer wanted his toys. At the time, Woody had no definite answer for the fake prophet. And the Pixar team could have left it there — ending on an optimistic image of the toys by mutually agreeing that they can’t stop Andy from growing up, but that they can enjoy the time they have left. Instead, 11 years later, John Lasseter & Company actually made an entire movie exploring that exact question. With gut-busting laughs (Mr. Potato Head as a flour tortilla) and suspiciously intense drama (toys being lowered into a fiery pit of death), this third Toy Story adventure hails as a clear success. Was considered. Story-wise, the film is not very original, with the plot of its escape being almost defeated by the second film. Still, for any audience member who grew up with Woody, Buzz, and the gang, it was about those last five minutes—when college-going Andy plays with his childhood toys for the last time. This is the movie that will make you believe that a tired teen can cry. —Mark Rosman

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18. Forrest Gump

  • Year: 1994
  • Director: Robert Zemeckis
  • Starring: Tom Hanks, Robin Wright, Gary Sinise, Sally Field, Rebecca Williams
  • Genre: Drama
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 142 minutes

Watch on FUBOTV

Few movies infiltrate the collective American psyche the way Forrest Gump managed. You’ve undoubtedly heard someone reference this 1994 classic—whether it was a classmate who was sarcastically shouting “Run, Forest, Run!” As you hustled to catch the bus, or someone busted your best takeaway, “Mama always said life is like a box of chocolates.” The entire film is filled with dialogue that is both moving and funny (my personal favorites include “But Lieutenant Dan, you have no legs” and “I’m sorry I had a fight at your Black Panther party”). Forrest may be an ordinary man, but his story is the story of our country, and we all run away emotionally as we see him hanging out with Elvis and John Lennon, fighting in Vietnam and facing numerous civilian protests. Is-all chasing his true love, Jenny. Tom Hanks delivers an Oscar-winning performance, and Gary Sinise is heartwarming as Lieutenant Dan. —Bonnie Stearenberg

17. Philadelphia

  • Year: 1993
  • Director: Jonathan Demme
  • Starring: Tom Hanks, Denzel Washington, Antonio Banderas
  • Genre: Drama
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 125 Minutes

Watch on Amazon Prime 

Jonathan Demme’s Philadelphia is one of those iconic 1990s photos we don’t see much like anymore. With top notch stars and dramatic courtroom scenes, its Philadelphia is beautiful and varied, bright and elaborately shot (plus, it hits the classic rock jackpot with original music by Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young). , But the heart of an art-house flick beats within Philadelphia, and it excels not only in its delicate handling of AIDS, homosexuality, and mortality, but also in its thoughtful examination of homosexuality—which should not have been expected in the mainstream. time movie. Tom Hanks as Andy Bennett, suffering from AIDS and suing his employer (a fancy law firm headed by the flamboyant Jason Robards) for wrongful termination, in standard ’90s message-film fashion, more or less a The Saint: A brilliant, kind upper -middle-class lawyer with a loving partner (Antonio Banderas) and a large, understanding family. More complicated is the character of Denzel Washington, a “TV lawyer” who agrees to take on Andy’s case but struggles to reconcile his own knee-jerk homophobia, even as his becomes his customer’s friend and champion. Philadelphia serves as a fitting backdrop for these conflicts, and the film’s extended opening montage takes us across the city, highlighting its grand humanity, as if to say, “It’s just a smattering of justice and tragedy.” It’s a small story. But there’s more to tell.” —Maura McAndrew

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16. World News

  • Year: 2020
  • Director: Paul Greengrass
  • Starring: Tom Hanks, Helena Zengel, Bill Camp, Elizabeth Marvel
  • Genre: Drama
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 118 minutes

Watch on iTunes

Paul Greengrass and screenwriter Luke Davis may consider Paulette Giles’ 2016 Western novel News of the World, at least partly, as a reflection of how far the United States has not come as a nation — after the book’s publication. Around the U.S., such cursive phrases as “fake news” and “alternative facts” were included in popular language by fascists and scoundrels attempting to increasingly pull on the American people. Neither of these words, nor their equally quirky cousins, make their way into Greengrass’s film, but the spirit that inspired them to be four years earlier is alive and well in the entertainment of the American frontier. Is. His protagonist is Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd (Hanks), a Confederate Civil War veteran who stands on the losing side of history, mows the Lone Star State and drives locals out of town at each stop of his journey. read the papers. Of course, the film doesn’t actually ask viewers to see which side of the war Kidd stood on: in fact, the truth of his old allegiances becomes more inevitable the more directly they are spoken of. This is Texas. In Texas a former soldier could only fight on one side of the aisle. News of the world curses Kidd without saying a word. But as the film judges him, it gives him a chance at redemption as a girl, Johanna (Helena Zengel). Zengl is a fresh spark in old-fashioned produce, but here’s a compliment to the old-fashioned. News of the World is not interested in changing or updating the classic Western formula: it is content with its function as a beautifully constructed studio portrait, clearly built around Hanks, but There is a lot of room for its young star to make a mark. What modernizes the film is more about the context than the content. Anyone trapped in the indentured servitude of social media—Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or worse, other people’s Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram accounts—has to appreciate this two-hour respite from the inevitable din publishers and platforms in our lives today. Needed. A lot of news happens, whether for better or worse, and News of the World only tries to give us the best. —Andy Crump

15. Bridge of Spies

  • Year: 2015
  • Director: Steven Spielberg
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Mark Rylance, Joel Coen, Amy Ryan, Alan Alda, Scott Shepherd
  • Genre: Thriller, Drama
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 142 Minutes

Watch on iTunes

Once again Steven Spielberg tells a story about the past but the present: In 1957, American lawyer Jim Donovan (Tom Hanks) is called upon to defend Soviet spy Rudolf Abel (Mark Rylance), who has lost his life. is on trial. Although taking the case makes him one of the most despised and misunderstood people in the country (not to mention his home), Donovan throws himself into it. As he sees it, giving his client a fair defense justifies and celebrates rather than undermines American values. This is clearly Spielberg’s idea, and there is a superficially persuasive quality to the film – we are invited to take pride in Donovan’s righteous stance and share his belief in the principles upon which the nation was built. went. Yet that sense of patriotism is undermined by the fact that a country that Donovan and Spielberg believe has been shown to be a place populated by idiots who are not worth defending or saving. The film thus takes on a strange, contradictory tone that is reminiscent of the best work of Frank Capra. This is a film intended to defend American values ​​in an America where those values ​​are so eroded that there are practically none. Bridge of Spies is right up there with its most evocative work, yet it has a straightforward, deceptive simplicity – it doesn’t force its contradictions or complications into the audience’s throat, and it makes them all the more engaging. —Jim Hemphill

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14. Post

  • Year: 2017
  • Director: Steven Spielberg
  • Stars: Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Sarah Paulson, Bob Odenkirk, Tracy Letts, Bradley Whitford, Bruce Greenwood, David Cross
  • Genre: Drama
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 116 Minutes

Watch on ABC.COM

The Post begins as a restrained process, only sticking to the facts surrounding obtaining the Washington Post in 1972, the top secret Pentagon Papers showing (without a doubt) that the American resolve to win the war in Vietnam is seriously had subsided – exactly the opposite mood the US administration was claiming at the time. This strictly factual approach has led to directors such as Gosta Gavras and, yes, Alan J. Would have made Pakula proud. Admittedly, this being a Steven Spielberg joint, The Post can’t help but slowly bring the enormous emotional tension to the forefront of the film, which allows us to ease the moment into a fairly manipulative but exhilarating finale. makes. None of this should come as a surprise: “manipulative but exhilarating” may well be the director’s calling card. The fact that the Post doesn’t stick to its obvious predecessors (All the President’s Men, Spotlight), its steadfast dedication to clearly eliciting strong emotional reactions from its audience might otherwise come across as outright criticism. Is. Drama with some of the best performances of the year. However, we are not living in microscopic time. With the rise of authoritarianism here in America, serious backlash on the First Amendment, explicitly declaring a free and open press the enemy of the people, the people need a populist piece of art with the subtlety of a sledgehammer in the face. So, in 2017, Spielberg is the perfect director to handle this story. Who better to wake us up, give us the passion and inspiration we need to not only continue the fight against such tyranny, but also to have some hope for salvation? Depending on one’s politics, The Post may be the most important film of the year, or a pathetic piece of the left-wing movement, but there’s no denying its effectiveness in eliciting a strong emotional response. —Octe Age Kozaki

13. Sleepless in Seattle

  • Year: 1993
  • Director: Nora Efron
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Rita Wilson, Victor Garber, Bill Pullman
  • Genre: Romantic Comedy
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 105 minutes

Watch on HBO Max

Sleepless in Seattle is essentially a giant love letter from writer/director Nora Ephron in 1957’s An Affair to Remember. Rita Wilson gives a memorable teardrop synopsis of the film, and Annie (Meg Ryan) invites Sam (Tom Hanks) to meet him on top of the Empire State Building before writing it down—the way Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr attempt. Let’s do it in his film – on Valentine’s Day. When they finally meet on Observation Deck, the theme of An Affair to Remember turns hilarious, setting the mood for anyone with an appreciation for good rom-coms.—Bonnie Stearenberg1

12. A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood

  • Year: 2019
  • Director Marielle Heller
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Matthew Rice, Chris Cooper, Maryann Plunkett
  • Genre: Drama
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 109 minutes

Watch on STARZ

One of the best things about a beautiful day in the neighborhood is how stubbornly opposed to what you think it’s going to be. Sure, it’s not a Fred Rogers reveal: In this narration, he’s kind and pure—but the movie never lets that end. The easy sanctity of public perception of Mister Rogers, the idea that you can only be kind and stick to that platitude and that will be enough, is a film that has been dismissed outright. Rogers himself is elusive, mysterious, but he is also clear and tangible: He exists in our physical realm and faces the same challenges that the rest of us go through, seeing the same pain and struggle as everyone else. In fact, Mister Rogers is not the main character of A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood. The protagonist is Lloyd Vogel (Matthew Rice, playing a fictionalized version of writer Tom Junod), a highly successful magazine journalist and new father who is cynical about the world and blames his alcoholic father (Chris Cooper) for abandoning his mother. crippled by anger. She was dying of cancer. His editor (a charming, much-missed Christine Lahti) offers him a short 400-word profile for Fred Rogers (Tom Hanks, of course) for the magazine’s “Heroes” edition, and the two people meet and let’s talk. You’d think the movie is about to go in a familiar direction since then, with the cynical journalist warming up to this American hero’s human kindness (that word again). And it does, a little. But the film is more than willing to get its hands dirty. wants to put in the work. The film is anchored in Hanks’ inherent goodness and ability to be likable as Rogers: he may actually be too big and much needed to capture Rogers, but he captures Rogers’ calm, at this very moment. A sense of total presence in. The film’s argument is not that we should all be like Mister Rogers, but that when tragedy strikes us, and anger overtakes us, we should strive for grace wherever we can find it. , The film is more interested in the hard, more harsh, and hard work of healing than empty slogans. This is true to the spirit of Mister Rogers, without telling him. I am sure he would love it. —Will Leach

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11. The Green Meal

  • Year: 1999
  • Director: Frank Darabonto
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Michael Clarke Duncan, David Morse, Bonnie Hunt
  • Genre: Drama, Fantasy
  • Rating: R
  • Runtime: 189 minutes

Watch on HBO Max

When it comes to faithfully capturing King’s Dickensian humanistic plays, you can’t go wrong with Frank Darabont. “Another Stephen King adaptation set in a prison?”, many fans of The Shawshank Redemption asked upon hearing about Darabont’s followup. I remember the hype and skepticism around the film going neck and neck in the cultural zeitgeist until the release of The Green Mile. Many fans were excited that Darabont returned to what it clearly did best, while an almost equal number feared that duplication of similar material would yield diminishing returns. The Green Mile wasn’t the masterpiece many hoped it would be, but it is a rock-solid epic drama with a heartfelt supernatural center. The magical element centering on a child-stricken inmate (Michael Clarke Duncan in star-making performance, RIP) who has the ability to heal others with a simple messenger touch certainly sets the two films apart. We do. Surface. The Green Mile’s tonal approach is also slightly darker as it leads to a more morally complex third act, the end of which disappointed some viewers because of it, but really impressed you. —Octe Age Kozaki

10. Toy Story 4

  • Year: 2019
  • Director: Josh Cooley
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Annie Potts, Tony Hale, Keegan-Michael Key, Jordan Peele
  • Genre: Animation, Adventure, Comedy
  • Rating: G
  • Runtime: 90 minutes

Watch on Disney+

We were all worried about Toy Story 4. How can we not? It’s probably the most beloved animated franchise of the last 50 years, and in the eyes of many, each film has been a little better than the last. That last one, Toy Story 3, ended in such a perfect, emotionally devastating fashion that trying to follow it felt like the ultimate fool’s mistake. And in the nine years since that installment, Pixar, as a company, has changed, becoming more corporate, more sequel-focused, more… Disney. So what a relief it is that Toy Story 4 is such a great joy. It may not quite reach the heights of Toy Story 3—which manages to be a prison escape film that also happens to be an in-depth dissertation on grief and death and has a surrealist tortilla—but it does. More than a worthy member of the family. Like its protagonist, it is less concerned with trying to do something revolutionary than it has been in the past and instead worrying about what comes next… about what the next logical progression is. It finds the next step for Woody (voiced as usual by Tom Hanks in what honestly has always been one of his best roles), and the franchise, while still being as hellapoppin’ and wildly entertaining as you are. Have come to expect from this franchise. , The overarching theme in Toy Story 4 is not so much death as it is loss—loss of purpose, loss of meaning, loss of value. What do you do with yourself when the best thing you’ve ever been a part of is already over? How do you find drive in life when your lifelong goal has been met? How do you deal with getting old and no longer needed? If these sound like key concepts for a Toy Story movie… you’ve never seen a Toy Story movie. —Will Leach

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9. A League of Their Own

  • Year: 1992
  • Director: Penny Marshall
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Geena Davis, Rosie O’Donnell, Madonna
  • Genre: Comedy, Drama
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 128 Minutes

Watch on iTunes

Of course, a film about women’s baseball during WWII would feature an outstanding cast of players (Geena Davis, Rosie O’Donnell, Madonna), but top billing was given to Tom Hanks. His portrayal of a fallen baseball trying to win respect (and kicking the bottle) is one of the actor’s finest moments and helped cement his title of most-loved actor on the American screen. Who can ever get tired of that famous quip, “There’s no crying in baseball!” The one staple that baseball commentators throw out like it’s their fastball? —Joe Shearer

8. Captain Phillips

  • Year: 2013
  • Director: Paul Greengrass
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Barkhad Abdi, Barkhad Abdirahman, Katherine Keener, Faisal Ahmed
  • Genre: Drama, Adventure
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 134 minutes

Watch on STARZ

Captain Phillips has proved that, while his imitators can do more harm than good, Paul Greengrass himself is lucky to have the kind of filmmaker cinephiles who surround him. Based on a 2009 incident in which an American cargo ship and its captain were taken hostage by Somali pirates, the film marks Greengrass’s best work since the 2006 9/11 drama United 93. What’s more, this is the kind of movie that you will be terrified of watching. Biting your nails and holding your breath with a sense of suspense—and that’s even when you know how the true story unfolded. Captain Phillips tells his titular character, Captain Richard Phillips (Tom Hanks), and his crew about their daily, somewhat monotonous routine. Unbeknownst to them, a gang of Somali pirates, led by Muse (Barkhad Abdi, in a successful performance) only watches from miles away, is plotting a strike. Phillips first becomes concerned when he receives an email warning him of a theft in the area. Shortly after, he sees the museum crew making their way to their ship. A defensive strategy fails, and the pirates find their way to the ship. This is where the film divides itself into two distinct parts. First, Phillips sees him attempting to stop the pirates as his crew, who have barricaded themselves in the lower depths of the ship, plan to gain control through traps and covert maneuvering that will take place at Home Alone. Would make Kevin McCallister proud. Once the plot really takes off, Hanks disappears into the role, perhaps his most powerful performance since 1998’s Saving Private Ryan. Using his inherent movie star skills, Hanks is able to embody both Phillips’ authoritative flair as well as successfully sell his cool-headed approach to the situation. Much of the film, meanwhile, is based on his growing desperation, along with his reactions and interactions with the pirates. Watching the slow, quiet erosion of Phillips’ restraint proves to be a little more harrowing than the film’s suspenseful sets. The character’s emotional arc eventually produces a scene that, without spoiling anything, is so powerful and raw that you almost can’t stand to watch as Hanks ends the moment with such a painful sense of reality. Huh. —Mark Rosman

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7. Big

  • Year: 1988
  • Director: Penny Marshall
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Elizabeth Perkins, Robert Loggia, John Heard, Jared Rushton
  • Genre: Comedy
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 104 Minutes

Watch on STARZ

If you ignore the problematic issues inherent in a 13-year-old’s mind entering a relationship with a thirty-year-old woman, Big remains attractive as of the time of his release. Tom Hanks as the central boy-man is an absolute delight to watch and the iconic scene where he and Robert Loggia perform “Heart and Soul” and “Chopsticks” on Loggia foot-operated keyboards even Enough to warm the cocks of even the most cynical audience. —Mark Rosman

6. Cast Away

  • Year: 2000
  • Director: Robert Zemeckis
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt
  • Genre: Adventure
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 143 minutes

Watch on Amazon Prime

For a full 75 minutes in the middle of the cast away, Tom Hanks is the only character on screen, unless of course you count his now-iconic volleyball Wilson. Before that, the film opens a FedEx package we’ll meet later and another travels to Russia, where we meet Chuck Noland, a FedEx exec with a toothache, training staff in Moscow and his girlfriend Kelly ( Helen is eager to return home. Hunt ) in Memphis. The couple enjoys a very busy Christmas party, before trying to sync their very busy schedule until the new year, where he plans to propose. But it’s the last time he’ll see her in years, when the plane goes down in the Pacific Ocean about 600 miles south of Cook Island. On a deserted island washed ashore, Noland must survive alone, and Hanks must pair the audience with someone else on screen. His efforts earned him a Golden Globe and the film grossed $430 million internationally. Without Hanks’ charisma, the slow-burn middle third of this one-man disaster film—Noland suffering from toothache, his loneliness, and his sense of conscience—wouldn’t have been nearly as entertaining. —Josh Jackson

5. Toy Story

  • Year: 1995
  • Director: John Lasseter
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Don Rickles, Wallace Shawn
  • Genre: Animation, Fantasy, Adventure
  • Rotten Tomatoes Score: 100%
  • Rating: G
  • Runtime: 80 minutes

Watch on Disney+

The one that started it all. Even today, Toy Story remains a remarkable technological achievement (the first computer-animated film) and a flawless blueprint for all of the Pixar films that followed: standout characters (Woody, Buzz, Potato Head, Slinky, Rex, and more); Add a decidedly sinister villain (in this case, the skull-shirted bully Sid); And top it with a well-rounded, awe-inspiring adventure, and you’ve got the earnestness of an enduring classic. Few movies can capture the true essence of childhood without featuring a child as the main character, but Pixar did just that in 1995 with Toy Story. The film’s hilarious (and heartwarming) competition between longtime toy-favorite Woody and charming newcomer Buzz Lightyear was not only entertaining—it explored themes of friendship, family, and eventually growing up. The film gave us our first glimpse into the legacy that Pixar solidified with classics like Up and Wall-E, not to mention three great sequels. —Jeremy Medina and Tyler Kane

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4. Apollo 13

  • Year: 1995
  • Director: Ron Howard
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Bill Paxton, Kevin Bacon, Gary Sinise, Ed Harris, Kathleen Quinlan
  • Genre: Drama, Adventure
  • Rating: PG
  • Runtime: 140 minutes

Watch at the Peacock

One of the most impressive exploits of this Ron Howard tour de force is that he took an incredibly well-documented true story where everyone knows the ending and made it into such a damn dramatic nail-biting — thanks to some, some extensive script doctoring by an allegedly unrecognized John Sayles. Meticulously researched and painstakingly attentive to accuracy, the film is never more concerned with the nuts and bolts of science and technology than it is with the humanity of the characters. Tom Hanks, Ed Harris, Kevin Bacon and Bill Paxton are at the top of their game here. —David J. greenberg

3. Catch Me If You Can

  • Year: 2002
  • Director: Steven Spielberg
  • Stars: Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks, Christopher Walken, Martin Sheen, Amy Adams, James Brolin
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Runtime: 141 minutes

Watch on Paramount+ 

For lovers of tang-in-cheek and smooth-as-silk, crime dramas like Stanley Donnan’s brilliantly twisty Charade in the ’60s, Catch Me If You Can is a great thick slice of cinematic comfort food. From the minimalist and pastel animated credit sequences, to the jazzy scores of John Williams, to the charming but non-condescending adventures of hot-to-hell conman Frank Abagnale Jr. (Leonardo DiCaprio in the role tailor-made for him). It’s a style throwback that cracks across. In his second role with the director (after Saving Private Ryan), Spielberg as an anal FBI agent on regular Tom Hanks, Abagnale’s Tail, is a straight-up foil to DiCaprio’s wild and loose youth, but the real MVP here. Christopher Walken as Abagnale’s strong-willed but tragically self-destructive working-class father.—Octe ge Kozak

2. Saving Private Ryan

  • Year: 1998
  • Director: Steven Spielberg
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Matt Damon, Tom Sizemore, Giovanni Ribisi, Adam Goldberg, Edward Burns
  • Genre: War, Drama, Action
  • Rating: R
  • Runtime: 169 minutes

Watch on FUBOTV

Despite its massive scale, Saving Private Ryan’s economy is an astonishing feat of storytelling. Barely a year into the founding of DreamWorks – the studio he created with Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen essentially allowed them to exercise free rein on their creative output – and impressed by Amistad’s relative despair, Steven Spielberg nearly took a tour of Europe. Created an imaginary picture for three hours. The waning weeks of World War II, all at once without allowing the nightmare breadth of the conflict to overtake the characters in their hearts. Twenty years later, and the film’s 30-minute salute detailing the documentary-like grit of the D-Day invasion of Normandy’s beaches, it still stands as iconic war filmmaking, but so primarily as the heavyweights of life. The focus is on the weight that’s lost. It’s a chaotic watch, even if you know exactly what you’re doing—even if you’ve seen it before. Within that initial stretch, ruthless and breathless, we learn all we’ll need to know about the people who live in this literal alien landscape, each character (played by people like Vin Diesel, Barry Pepper, and Giovanni Ribisi). has been presented with accuracy. Key of a master who has figured out how to balance all that historical load. For us Millennials who first began to understand what our grandparents endured as we age (as our grandfathers went to war as we age), Saving Private Ryan shook the earth of a director. was the giving film, which’ d already raised us on big, blown-up entertainment. For us and anyone else, the film is a perfect, heartbreaking feat, as Captain Miller (Tom Hanks) was given the titular mission of the film, Spielberg by fate. —Dom Cinchola

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1. Toy Story 2

  • Year: 2012
  • Director: John Lasseter
  • Stars: Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack
  • Genre: Animation, Adventure
  • Rating: G
  • Runtime: 92 Minutes

Watch on Disney+

Toy Story was a revelation of technology. Its sequel was simply a revelation. When Woody is stolen by Seinfeld’s Newman, it’s Buzz Lightyear’s turn to save the day. The toy store scene with tour guide Barbie (“I’m a married spud, I’m a married spud”) and Buzz Toys is priceless. Improving the original in almost every way, Toy Story 2 took the characters we fell in love with in the first film and ripped them apart—usually a recipe for disaster. But in this case, Woody has integrated new characters impeccably with the rest of the round-up gang’s quest, and the sheer scale of the story allows the sequel to gravitate more. —Josh Jackson and Jeremy Medina

Source: Josh Jackson, Paste Magazine, Direct News 99

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